Graduate Course Descriptions | Chemistry and Biochemistry | SIU

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Graduate Course Descriptions

411-3 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry.

Fundamentals of inorganic chemistry, covering bonding and structure, coordination compounds and the chemistry of some familiar and less familiar elements. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: 456 or 462 or concurrent enrollment. Offered spring semester only. Top

431-3 Environmental Chemistry.

Chemical principles applied to the environment and environmental problems. Chemical kinetic, thermodynamic and equilibrium concepts as they relate to the atmosphere, water and soil will be discussed to include current problems of pollutants, pollutant evaluation and pollutant remediation. Discussion of methods for the chemical analysis of environmental samples will also be included. Prerequisite: C or better in 230 and 340. Offered spring semester in even years only. Top

434-2 or 4 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry.

Theory and practice of instrumental measurements, including emission and absorption spectroscopic, capillary electrophoretic and chromatographic methods. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratories per week for four credits. Enrollment for two credit hours is restricted to graduate students in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry who are advised to take instrumental analysis. Laboratory fee: $30. Prerequisite: C or better 230. Offered fall semester only. Top

439-3 Forensic Chemistry.

A one-semester course covering the collection, handling and analyses of forensic samples and evidence. Topics include procedures to collect, preserve, maintain custody, analyze, validate the data and report conclusions from the analyses of crime related samples. Analytical methods for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of samples by gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy will be covered. Other techniques such as capillary and gel electrophoresis, high-pressure liquid chromatography, thin layer chromatography, blood splattering analyses, fingerprint identification, scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy may be included as time permits. One lecture and two three-hour periods containing laboratory experiments, demonstrations, and group discussions per week. Enrollment is limited with preference given to students with high academic standings. Laboratory fee: $30. Prerequisite: C or better in 230 and previous or concurrent enrollment in 434 and instructor consent. Offered spring semester only. Top

444-3 Intermediate Organic Chemistry.

A transitional course between introductory and graduate level chemistry. The chemistry of carbon compounds based upon a mechanistic approach will be discussed. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: C or better in 340, 342. Offered fall semester in even years only. Top

451-6 (3, 3) Biochemistry.

(Same as Microbiology 451, Biochemistry 451 and Molecular Biology, Microbiology and Biochemistry 451)

 (a) Chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins and enzymes; enzyme kinetics; chemistry, function and metabolism of carbohydrates; citric acid cycle; electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation.

(b) Chemistry, function and metabolism of lipids; nitrogen metabolism; nucleic acid and protein biosynthesis; metabolic regulation. Three lectures per week. Must be taken in a,b sequence. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry. Top

456-3 Biophysical Chemistry.

(Same as Biochemistry 456 and Molecular Biology, Microbiology and Biochemistry 456) A one-semester course in biophysical chemistry intended for biochemists and molecular biologists. Emphasis will be on solution thermodynamics, kinetics and spectroscopy applied to biological systems. Prerequisite: 340 and 342, 451a or concurrent enrollment, Mathematics 141 or 150. Top

461-3 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy.

An introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Mathematics 250; C or better in 230, 342, 343; Mathematics 221 or 305 is recommended as prerequisite or concurrent enrollment. Top

462-3 Classical Physical Chemistry

An introduction to chemical, statistical thermodynamics and kinetics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 250; C or better in 230, 342, 343; Mathematics 221 or 305 is recommended as prerequisite or concurrent enrollment. Offered spring semester only. Top

466-2 (1,1) Physical Chemistry Laboratory.

A two-semester laboratory sequence. One three-hour laboratory per week per semester. (a) Experiments relating to topics covered in 462 Prerequisite: 462 or 456 or concurrent enrollment. (b) Experiments relating to topics covered in 461. Laboratory fee: $30. Prerequisite: 461 or concurrent enrollment. 466a offered spring semester only. 466b offered fall semester only. Top

468-3 Application of Symmetry to Chemistry

The concepts of symmetry elements, groups and character tables will be taught. Symmetry will be applied to molecules in order to simplify and characterize their wave functions and vibrational frequencies. Prerequisite: C or better in 461 or consent of instructor. Offered spring semester in odd years only. Top

479-3 Principles of Materials Chemistry.

Introduction to fundamental concepts of materials chemistry. Synthesis, characterization, processing and applications of different materials including solids, polymers, ceramics and molecularly designed materials. Prerequisite: 411, 462 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor. Offered fall semester in odd years only. Top

489-1 to 3 Special Topics in Chemistry.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and of chair. Top

511-6 (3,3) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

(a)Principles of group theory and their application to molecular structure, ligand field theory and its application and magnetic properties of matter.

 (b) Energetics, kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic systems. Prerequisite: one year of physical chemistry, 411. Top

519-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry.

Metal ions in biological processes and other selected topics to be announced by the department. Maximum credit nine semester hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Top

531-3 Introduction to Analytical Separations.

An introduction to the basic principles underlying separation science, with emphasis on all major chromatographies, gel and capillary electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, field-flow fractionation, rate and isopynic sedimentation, filtration, reverse osmosis and related methods. Prerequisite: Mathematics 250. Top

532-3 Analytical Chemistry Instrumentation.

Introduction to analog and digital electronics and the computer control of system components. The course will focus on chemical instrumental and the use of filters, amplifiers and digital signal processing to improve sensitivity and detection limits. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 434. Top

533-3 Analytical Spectroscopy.

Fundamental and experimental aspects of electronic and vibrational spectrometry, with a particular emphasis on the spectroscopic analysis of atomic and molecular species. Various sources of electromagnetic radiation, detectors, optical components and the optimization of experimental methods are covered in detail. Common spectroscopic techniques are covered in detail and a portion of the course covers newly emerging techniques and developments. Prerequisite: 434. Top

534-3 Electrochemistry.

Fundamentals and applications of electrochemical methods, with emphasis on the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer, electrode double-layer structures, as well as varied voltammetric techniques. Prerequisite: 462. Top

535-3 Advanced Analytical Chemistry.

Course surveys various statistical, data-manipulative, and numerical methods as applied to analytical chemistry, including probability distributions, methods of maximum likelihood, linear and nonlinear least squares, correlation coefficients, chi-square, F and T distributions, Pearson statistics, analysis of variance, convolution, deconvolution, cross-correlation, autocorrelation, data acquisition, Nyquist theorem, aliasing, digitization errors, digital filtering, Monte Carlo methods, and finite-difference equations. Prerequisite: 434. Top

536-3 Principles of Mass Spectrometry.

This course is an introduction to mass spectrometry with a focus on pharmaceutical and biological applications. Topics that will be covered include instrument design, ionization techniques, tandem mass spectrometry, chromatography/mass spectrometry and mass spectral interpretation. Prerequisite: 434. Top

537-3 Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

Fundamental and experimental aspects of analytical methods based on the various phenomena of luminescence. General principles of luminescence are covered in detail, as well as analytical techniques based on fluorescence quenching, energy transfer, polarization, and time resolved methods. Aspects of source of electromagnetic radiation, detectors, and electronic/optical components are discussed specifically as they pertain to fluorescence spectroscopy. Newly emerging fluorescence based techniques are also discussed. Prerequisite: 434 and 533 (or consent of the instructor). Top

538-3 Nanoscale Probing and Imaging.

This course covers basic principles of scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy including STM, AFM, ACM and NSOM, and the broad applications in nanoscale probing and imaging. Topics include surface characterization and manipulation, nanolithography, nanomaterials, self-assembly, molecular electronics, optoelectronics, nanoscale electron transfer, single-molecule spectroscopy, protein structures, enzyme dynanics and living cell imaging. Prerequisite: undergraduate physical and analytical chemistry. Top

539-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry.

Selected topics of interest to practicing analytical chemists such as microanalytical chemistry, functional-group chemical determinations, absorption spec-troscopy and electroanalytical chemistry. Maximum credit nine semester hours. Prerequisite: 434. Top

541-3 Organic Structure and Reactivity.

Structure and reactivity of organic compounds: steric, electronic, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects and their relation to reactive intermediates. Prerequisite: Master’s degree in chemistry, or a grade of B or better in 444, or passing grade on the organic diagnostic examination. Top

542-3 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry.

Reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry. Electrocyclic and sigmatropic reactions, cycloadditions, free radicals, photochemistry and organometallic catalysis. Spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: Master’s degree in chemistry, or a grade of B or better in 444, or passing grade or the organic placement examination. Orbital symmetry, photochemistry and the chemistry of the common transient intermediates. Prerequisite: Master’s degree in chemistry, or a grade of B or better in 444, or passing grade on the organic placement examination. Top

543-3 Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

Organic synthesis: classical and modern methods. Prerequisite: Master’s degree in chemistry, or a grade of B or better in 444, or passing grade on the organic chemistry placement examination. Top

549-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry.

Specialized topics in organic chemistry. The topic to be covered is announced by the department. Maximum credit nine semester hours. Prerequisite: 542. Top

552-3 Biomolecular Structure and Function.

This course will cover the structural basis of biomolecules with an emphasis on the chemical and physical aspects involved in the architecture of proeins and nucleic acids. The study of the physical properties of biomolecular interactions and assembly of biomolecules into macro-molecular complexes will be covered. Interpretation of data from atomic resolution techniques will be discussed. Prerequisites: 350 or 451a/b and 461/462 equivalent. Top

559-1 to 3 Advanced Topics in Biological Chemistry.

Specialized topics in biological chemistry. The topic to be covered is announced by the department. Maximum credit nine semester hours (1 to 3 per semester). Prerequisite: C or better in 350 or 451a/b or equivalent. Top

560-3 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry.

Basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics to chemistry. Topics include operator and vector algebra, classical mechanics, angular momentum, approximate methods, hydrogen-like atoms and molecular electronic structure. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: one year of un-dergraduate physical chemistry. Top

561-3 Molecular Orbital Theory.

An introduction to molecular orbital theory. Applications and limitations of various methods. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: one year of undergraduate physical chemistry including quantum mechanics. Top

562-3 Advanced Molecular Spectroscopy.

Theory of rotational and vibrational spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy of molecules. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: 468 or consent of instructor. Top

564-3 Statistical Thermodynamics.

Principles of statistical mechanics and applications to equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems. Topics include ideal gases, monatomic crystals, lattice statistics, the cluster method, correlation functions, Brownian motion, the Boltzmann equation and the Kubo-Green technique. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: 461 and 462 or consent of instructor. Top

569-1 to 9 (1 to 3 per semester) Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry.

Topic to be announced by the department. Maximum credit nine semester hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Top

575-3 Methods of Materials Characterization.

An introduction to the structural, morphological, spectroscopic, and thermal characterization techniques commonly used in materials chemistry. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Top

579-3 Topics in Advanced Materials. Design and applications of advanced materials.

Special topics will focus on contemporary research areas of interest as determined by the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Top

592-1 Introduction to Research.

Introduction to the techniques and methods of chemical research including good laboratory practice, research ethics, record keeping, publication, patents and currently active research in this department. Graded S/U only. Top

594-2 to 3 Special Readings in Chemistry.

Assigned library work in any of these fields of chemistry with individual instruction by a staff member. (a) Analytical, (c) Inorganic, (d) Organic, (e) Physical. Maximum credit three hours. Top

595-1 Advanced Seminar in Chemistry.

Advanced level talks presented by graduate students. (a) Analytical, (c) inorganic, (d) organic, and (e) physical chemistry. Top

596-1 to 6 (1 to 3 per semester) Master’s Degree Research.

Graded research for Master’s Degree only. Maximum 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: admission to Master’s program in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Completion of at least 9 hours of graded graduate course work in the program. Permission of student’s graduate advisory com-mittee. Top

597-1 to 15 Professional Training.

Experience in teaching of chemistry, instrument operation and special research projects. One hour required each semester in residence. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Top

598-1 to 50 (1 to 12 per semester) Research.

Maximum credit 50 hours, except by permission of the student’s graduate advisory committee. Graded S/U only. Prerequisite: consent of chair. Top

599-1 to 6 Thesis.

Maximum credit six hours. Prerequisite: consent of chair. Top

600-1 to 30 (1 to 12 per semester) Dissertation—Doctoral.

Requirement for Ph.D. degree, 24 hours. Maximum credit 30 hours, except by permission of the student’s graduate advisory committee. Prerequisite: 598. Top

601-1 per semester Continuing Enrollment.

For those graduate students who have not finished their degree programs and who are in the process of working on their dissertation, thesis, or research paper. The student must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, or research hours before being eligible to register for this course. Concurrent enrollment in any other course is not permitted. Graded S/U or DEF only. Top